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Egyptian Mau


Origins :

Almost certainly traces its ancestry from the African Wild Cat Felis Lybia Ocreata. More recently It was known they were being bred in continental Europe before the 2nd World War.. however by the end of the war few remained and they were close to extinction. They were rescued by a Russian Princess by the name of Nathalie Troubletsky. When emigrating to USA from Italy she took a few cats of Italian and Egyptian Origin. Subsequently, the line was developed in North America. This breed arrived in the UK in 1998.There was another line of cats called “Egyptian Mau” that was bred in the UK, but the two should not be confused. This second line was bred from Siamese cats and is now officially called Spotted Tabbies.

Physical Appearance:

This is a a medium sized cat, very elegant in its stance and has a striking resemblance to cats in ancient Egyptian art. They have an exotic spotted pattern to their coats and what is often describes as a “worried facial expression”. They are defined by their large gooseberry green eyes and they should have an “M” pattern in their fur over their forehead. There are three colours: Silver; Bronze; and Smoke (or jet black).

Personality:

The Egyptian Mau is an intelligent cat. He is quick to learn where his food and toys are kept and how to open doors etc. They adore toys and enjoy playing fetch. They are an intensely social animal, get on well with other cats and bond well with people.

Availability:

This breed is rare and records suggest only 500 kittens are born worldwide a year. They are very rare in Britain and if you want one there is likely to be a long waiting list. Claim to Fame:The Egyptian Mau is said to have the fastest reflexes of all cats.

Popularity: 58% [?]

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Burmese Cats


Origins:
Myth states that the Burmese Cats were the original ‘Guard Cats” for the Burmese Temples. This remains to be seen, but history tells as a fact, that all Burmese cats today in the West are ancestors of one Particular cat. Wong Mau, a walnut-brown queen was taken from Rangoon (the capital of Burma) and introduced to America in 1930. It wasn’t until 1948 that he made his first appearance in the UK. SealCoat Blue Surprise was the first Blue Burmese born in the UK in 1955.

Physical Appearance:

The Burmese is classed as a Short-hair and indeed her coat is shiny and dense. It overlays a medium-sized, sturdy, and well-muscled body. The head is rounded (unlike the long profile of the Siamese) a firm chin, and wide-set ears. Coat colours are: brown, blue, tortie, chocolate tortie, and lilac tortie. Burmese are quite vocal (though not as much as the Siamese). Burmese can live into their late teens.

Personality:

This breed’s popularity is due largely to their extrovert, intelligence and character. They are often known as the people’s cat as they will seek out Humans in order to be with them. Within your home they are likely to follow you as you change the room you are in. Many have behaviours that one would normally expect from a dog! Such as retrieving and fetching objects, finding their toys and bringing them to their owners and being walked on a harness and lead. Expect to here vocal demands of “Play with me and my toy!” A very intelligent cat, the Burmese can learn how to open doors and cupboards and unravel toilet rolls.

Take into account:

Due to their strong social feeling for people they make ideal house pets. They get on well with children and usually other animals too. It is perhaps advised to keep Burmese as house cats because of their friendliness may lead them astray. At the same time they are very active and demanding cats. They will call for a great deal of attention. So they are perhaps not the cat of choice for an owner who is unable to meet these requests. Burmese breeders in the UK are plentiful.

Popularity: 21% [?]

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Norwegian Forest Cat


Origins:
This cat does actually come from Norway. His claim to fame is he is the descendant of the cats that the Viking sailors took back to their homeland from Turkey, Spain, Africa, and Russia. But his real beginnings go back even further to Norse legend. From the 7th, 8th and 9th centuries myths talk of Freya the Norse God of Love. Her chariot was pulled by two huge grey cats. Thier descriptions very much answer the cat we know and love today.

Physical Appearance:

The average male will reach a weight of between 13 and 22lbs and females are usually half this size. Like most well-kept cats they have an average lifespan of between 15 and 20 years. They are classed as a semi-long haired cat and carry a thick and long coat. There tails are magnificently bushy.

Well I Never!:

The Norwegian Forest has a trick up its sleeve that no other cat can do. He can climb down trees head first. This breed loves climbing so keep an eye out!

Take into account:

This breed is a big cat and so will need the room and space and climbing areas to feel good . If he has not got this he is likely to get bored and has known to become a little destructive. Because of his coat he will need regular grooming. Especially in the spring, when he begins to moult his winter fur. Due to his even temperement he gets on well with children and other pets. History: After the different varieties interbred, the harsh Norwegian weather ensured that only those cats with the most rugged coats survived. First imported into Britain in 1987. First Championship in 1997.

Appearance:

Come in most colours except for seal-point and lilac. They are classed as semi-longhaired cats. They grow quite large and are distinguished by thier huge bushy tails.

Personality:

Intelligent, fearless and lively. Can get on well wiith dogs and children.

Popularity: 80% [?]

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Pedigree Cat Registration in North America and Europe


If you live in the United States and are looking for a pedigree cat, then you can’t avoid coming across the acronym CFA, in full Cat Fanciers’ Association.The CFA was founded in 1906 with the intention of maintaining the integrity of cat breeds and holds the largest register of pedigree cats in the world. The association also organises cat shows, provides judges and indeed runs training programs for show judges as well as continuing the registration of purebred kitten litters.

The CFA currently recognises thirty nine breeds of cat for showing in the Championship Class and one in the Miscellaneous Class, the Ragamuffin. The Provisional Class is for breeds which have not yet been accepted for Championship Class and neutered males and spayed females may be shown in the Premiership Class. There are also show classes for pedigree kittens and household pets. Those in the Household Pet Class can be of any origin, colour, length of coat, etc. but must be neutered or spayed if over eight months old and must not have been declawed. Interesting colours and markings and a friendly personality are a must .

Bengal Cat

Bengal Cat

For kittens to retain the pedigree of their sire and dam the litter must be registered with the CFA by their breeder. When kittens become rehomed, their new owner must register them individually. The owner may only register a cat for breeding only if the breeder provides the appropriate pin number for use on the registration form, otherwise the cat’s offspring, if any, may not be registered as purebred.

There are other associations around the world for the registration of pedigree cats. In Canada the Canadian Cat Association formed in 1960, in the United Kingdom the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF), established in 1910 and in Europe, the Federation Internationale Feline, founded in 1949, based in Luxembourg but representing forty one countries around the globe. These organisations, like the CFA, are dedicated to maintaining breed standards, ensuring the proper care of all cats and organising and staffing cat shows as well as educating judges and the general public alike. The GCCF currently registers approximately 32,000 pedigree cats each year.

In the USA, Breeds of cats are categorised as either short haired such as the Siamese, the Abyssinian and the British Shorthair while the long haired breeds includ the Persion and Turkish Angoras. In Britain the categorisation is more complex and includes Persian, British, Foreign, Burmese, Oriental and Siamese, while in Europe the categories are Persian and Exotic, Shorthair and Somali, Siamese and Oriental. Both include the semi-long haired e.g. the Turkish Van and the Maine Coon.

Of all the many breeds, the American Shorthair is the most popular in the USA while in Britain, the British Shorthair breed has had the most registrations since the year 2000, having gradually overtaken the Persian whose numbers have dwindled significantly since the late 1980s.

If you want to be sure of certain characteristics in your cat, you need to select a recognised breed and any one of the above organisations have extensive websites full of information which will help you make your choice.

Popularity: 18% [?]

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