Archive | Breeder or Adoption?

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Cat Adoption - Ten Things to Consider Before You Adopt a Cat


Cats can make wonderful pets, but before you go ahead with cat adoption, there are a number of important things to think about. A lot of people who haven’t owned cats think they’re very independent and need much less care than other pets. This definitely isn’t the case. Here are 10 important questions to ask yourself before you adopt a cat.

1. Can you afford it?
Food, treats, toys, scratching post, bedding, litter boxes, litter, flea treatment, worming tablets, vaccinations, visits to the vet, pet insurance, cattery costs… it all adds up, and it’s not cheap.

2. Are you around enough?
Your cat needs regular, fresh meals and a constant supply of fresh drinking water.

3. Are you able to give your cat attention every day?
Cats need lots of human companionship. It’s not fair on a cat to leave him alone for long, frequent periods. Most cats are OK to be left alone while their owners are out at work during the day, as long as they get attention in the evening.

4. Are you willing to put up with some damage to your home?
A home with a cat is unlikely to survive completely unscathed. Your furniture may get scratched, your cat may do the odd pee or poop on the carpet, he may throw up on the sofa…

5. Do you have a safe area where your cat can play?
Your cat will need a safe area to exercise in (whether that’s indoors or outdoors). If it’s outdoors, it needs to be well away from busy traffic etc.

6. Is your home environment suitable?
If you have a dog or young kids, for example, you’ll need to ensure the cat you adopt is able to cope with them. Also, are there any areas in your home that would be unsafe for a cat (a workshop in the garage for example), and if so do you have a way of keeping the cat out of there?

7. Do you have enough time?
Cats need playing with every day. Long haired cats need grooming every day, short haired cats once every few days.

8. Are you OK with cleaning the litter box?
You’ll need to scoop out the box at least once every day and clean it out completely once a week.

9. Are you able to care for your cat if he gets sick?
This may mean taking some days off work, staying up with your cat overnight, giving him medication, cleaning his eyes, ears, nose etc.

10. Are you prepared for the commitment?
Lots of cats are now living into their late teens and even early 20s. If you’re 25 and single now, there’s a good chance your cat will still be alive when you’re 40 and married with kids.

If you are able to provide the right environment and enough time and commitment, cat adoption will likely be one of the most rewarding and pleasurable things you ever do.

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Pet Adoption What You Need To Know Before You Adopt


Shelters also have healthy animals and they are not expensive. Adoption counselors in the shelter help owners in arriving at a decision on pets. Shelter adoption fees are usually much less than purchasing a pet at a store or breeder. And your new pet is more likely to be vaccinated, dewormed, and spayed or neutered. Shelter pets are a bargain. For an pet adoption fee between $60 and $100, you can adopt an animal that would cost several hundred dollars through other means.

Animal shelters and pet adoption centers do their best to accommodate dog rescues, and look forward to all dog adoptions. Every time a dog is adopted, one more dog is saved from possible euthanasia. Animal Control adoption regulations require that all currently owned pets be up-to-date on rabies vaccinations and animal licensing. Landlord approval is needed for tenants of rental properties. Animal lovers that we are, we knew that there must be a better way! In the beginning, we had a very small adoption fee, very few requirements for adopting, and our pets had virtually no vet care prior to adoption.

Pet adoption can be an informal or formal arrangement. Some owners will post adverts about pets to a good home, where by they just pass on responsibility to someone else, creating an informal adoption process. Pet adoption should always be something that people should consider when looking for a new pet. A quick look around the numerous animal shelters will uncover dogs, cats, rabbits, horses, in fact any animal that you can think. Pet adoption allows you to legally own a dog in an easy manner. Lots of wonderful, beautiful puppies and dogs are wanting of deserving pet owners to adopt them and give them a home to enjoy.

Shelter pets are a bargain. For an pet adoption fee between $60 and $100, you can adopt an animal that would cost several hundred dollars through other means. Shelters and rescue organizations agree that black cats are the last ones chosen from any litter. We can’t understand it - they are shiny, sleek awesome companions! Shelters also have healthy animals and they are not expensive. Adoption counselors in the shelter help owners in arriving at a decision on pets.

Rescue groups are also a good source for information about a specific breed and can give you information about reputable breeders if you desire. Rescues are very careful to make sure their adoptable dogs and cats go to the right homes. Each organization has its own application and screening process for potential adopters.

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Adopting A Cat From A Shelter


Animal shelters bear the consequences of reckless breeding practices, the failure of pet owners to responsibly spay and neuter their pets and the heart-wrenching acts of neglect and abuse. In addition, abandoned pets and strays are taken in at a rate that often exhausts the capacity of the shelter. Reputable animal shelters deserve our attention and financial support.

It is advantageous for a cat lover to adopt a pet from a shelter. Shelters offer a wide array of companion pets for all sorts of individuals and families. While animals receive adequate care in a shelter, nothing compares to the everyday comforts of a warm and loving home.

Adopting a cat at a shelter is the best possible way of ensuring the mutual satisfaction and love that both the pet owner and the pet deserve. In addition, cats in shelters have developed personalities that allow a person to more accurately choose one that will best suit one’s lifestyle. It’s tempting to want to start with a kitten. However, in addition to the unexpected inconvenience, chores and energy of dealing with a kitten, there’s no guarantee that the ultimate personality will suit your lifestyle or home situation. Contrary to your first inclination, kittens are not the best choice for young children. A cat that is at least one year-old offers the best chance of giving a young child a positive experience with their first pet. Mature cats are much easier to care for, and more predictable in their behavior. Shelter workers are genuinely interested in helping you find the right cat for your personality, demeanor and home situation, and will assist in helping you make a wise decision and investment.

Adopting your cat from a shelter is also substantially more economical. A majority of shelter cats are of a mixed-breed, without the inherited health issues many times associated with particular full breed cats. Shelter cats are usually spayed, neutered and vaccinated. Special discounts are often available for spay or neuter programs if your cat is adopted at a young age. You can also adopt a set of cats that have bonded, or litter mates at a lower price. This is often a very rewarding experience that enhances the quality of life for the cats, as well as the companionship one ultimately enjoys. The price of adoption can vary. Certain shelters ask for approximately $100 for a cat, but it can be substantially less. In addition to spay and neutering, the adoption fee from a reputable shelter will usually include vaccinations for distemper and testing for both feline AIDS and feline leukemia. The average cost for feline AIDS and leukemia treatment is $45-$75 for each disease. Spaying or neutering can run up a bill of $45-$90 and vaccinations typically cost $150-$300. Adopting a cat from a shelter not only relieves the burden of overcrowding that many shelters experience, but it’s obviously the more cost effective choice.

If one is insistent about a particular breed, the selection at a shelter includes most every breed at one time or another. In addition, there are many organizations that specialize in the rescue and adoption of specific breeds. Most of these can be located online or by referral of your local shelter. The employees and volunteers of the shelter want what’s best for the cat and will work together to help you find the best possible match.

Shelters are in special need during the spring and early fall seasons. These are the breeding seasons, and shelters are generally overrun with kittens that need homes. If you’re an experienced cat owner, capable of the responsible ownership of a kitten, and committed to the life-long care of a cat of uncertain personality and health, a kitten can be a very rewarding and enjoyable experience.

To locate an adoption center in your area, check your phonebook or with a local veterinarian; or contact the Humane Association of the United States. Millions of cats who do not get adopted are humanely euthanized annually in the United States. By taking a feline companion into your home, you will be saving a life, and making room for other cats to have a chance of living a full life in a nurturing environment.

Remember: pet ownership is a life commitment. Consider the long-term care and expenses of the cat, and be willing to accept the difficult times as well as the memorable experiences and priceless companionship your cat will return to you.

Finally, support local and national shelters as well as the many organizations that provide badly needed services and ensure the humane treatment of our valuable animal friends.

Cat ownership is a serious decision. Taking an animal into your care will require knowledge, cat nutrition and the the proper supplies

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Which cat should I buy?


So you’ve decided to buy a Cat. First of all there are probably two different routes you can go down. Either you decide to get a cross-bred cat or “moggie” or you decide to get a pedigree cat.

I have never liked the word “Moggie”. It tends to send messages of a lesser class of cat. This, as owners will know, could not be further from the truth. They can be as affectionate, playful, unpredictable, irritating, exasperating and as beautiful as any other of his/her feline cousins. The real difference between the two is when you buy the latter you have a better chance of guaranteeing the looks, temperament and personality. In this way you can be more specific about what you would like your cat to be like.

The cross-bred is more likely to have unique looks and unpredictable character which some would say makes them all the more endearing. Because they are not pure-bred and also have not been through what I would call the “stable system”, they are not so expensive. Often they are advertised free via Newsagents windows, church magazines, or such like when the queens brood proves too expensive to keep.

But other places to bear in mind are the RSPCA or Animal or Cat shelters. They will not always have kittens available but you may well be helping to re-home a desperate cat who can offer much affection in return.

When searching for a pedigree you will probably have a breed in mind already. Expect to pay between £300 (average) and £1,200 for the rare oriental breeds. Be very wary of breeders who are offering kittens at ridiculously low prices. There is a danger these cats have not been looked after properly, not been given the correct vetinary input and questionable whether they are pure-bred at all. If ever you are buying kittens from a private owner and you are suspicious they are not being looked after properly, contact the RSPCA. You may well be saving a lot of heart-ache in the future.

Take into account the cats temperament, and personality. Are they likely to be too demanding? Will they yearn for the out doors too much? Do they get on with other cats? Cats such as Burmese, Tonkinese, and Siamese are very demanding and almost need to be played with at times like you would a dog. How will this affect your everyday family life? The British Blue is more your traditional lap cat. Eat sleeps and keeps to himself.

Cats differ quite significantly in size. The Maine Coon, British Blue and Norwegian Forest are all quite massive cats when fully grown; the deven or Cornwall Rex are both quite small. Is your home big enough for the bigger cats if they are going to be kept in? Finally be aware that a long haired cat takes a lot of grooming.

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