Tag Archive | "fights"

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Dealing With Cat Anxiety


Some stressful situations that can cause cat anxiety for your cat are: being alone in the house, or when visitors to the home, another new pet or family member, moving to a new home, visits to the veterinarian, adjusting to a new environment, and multiple cat households. Unfortunately, when cats suffer from stress and anxiety, they generally communicate it in a very clear way that can really turn humans upside down. One of the real signs that usually tell us is that they are not using the cat litter box.

Cats with separation anxiety don’t howl and bay like dogs and theydon’tchew on doors and windowsills in frantic attempts to escape. Their misery is far less obvious and it sometimes takes a sleuth of an owner to appreciate what is going on. Separation anxiety in cats is a less common phenomenon and typically gives rise to behaviors that are not as destructive as those of a dog suffering from separation anxiety. It is so uncommon in cats that it was not till recently that the disorder was considered to be absent in the feline species.

Separation anxiety is a very distressing condition for pets and their owners. Although it is difficult to treat, the long term benefits of having a happier and healthier pet are well worth the time spent training your pet. Separation anxiety: canine and feline and human beings alike, are all prone to and suffer from active bouts of stress due to environmental, emotional, and physical factors. Such stressful times can not only be harmful to your pet, but also to you as a pet owner.

Cats normally are fastidious groomers and as much as 30 - 50% of their time awake is spent performing some type of grooming behavior. One uncommon sign of cat anxiety may be excessive grooming, to the point of creating a bald spot on one or two areas of the body. Cats may show their distress in other, less obvious ways such as becoming too anxious to eat when left alone; or vomiting only when the owner is not there.

Cats find consistent routines and predictable environments very comforting, so try to keep your cat’s activities on a schedule. Playtimes, mealtimes, and bedtimes should occur at approximately the same time every day. Cats with anxiety related elimination problems also may spray, but do so for other than hormonal reasons. Instead, something in their environment causes them to become anxious. Cats commonly start to manifest their stress or anxiety by what is politely called inappropriate toiletary behavior.

Cats are very sensitive to their owner’s emotions, so if you’re nervous during thunderstorms, your cat probably will be, too. Learning to calm yourself will help both of you. Cats who display this type of behavior generally follow their owners around everywhere, rather than explore the outside world. They may even continue the suckling behavior and chew and suck on their owner’s cloths and even hand.

Cats can be very social animals and they can experience anxiety when they are separated from their owners. Cats like to know when their big cat mom and/or dad are coming and going, so they can adjust their schedules accordingly. If you or your partner takes a new job that drastically changes your household routine and lifestyle, your cat may get seperation anxiety

Aggressive behavior can be sign of stress anxiety. Owners who claim that cat play fighting did not present a problem until the cat was six or seven years old are ignoring one vital fact. Up until that age (middle age in cats) he will have taken his fights elsewhere. When the behavior is exhibited in the owner’s presence, attention can be withdrawn by turning or walking away, or some form of remote indirect punishment not associated with the owner could be used.

Owners should never physically punish their cat; even a harmless tap on the nose may be viewed as a challenge and the cat may become even more aggressive. The most effective reaction to status-induced aggression is to ignore the cat completely.

Ask your veterinarian about giving a tranquilizer to the cat to reduce cat anxiety and possibly help reduce destructive behavior. A comprehensive dietary supplement designed for animals exhibiting nervousness, hyperactivity, anxiety or responding to environmentally induced stress is also available from your veterinarian.

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Pet Adoption After Losing a Pet


If your family has experienced the loss of a pet, or if your pet is getting older, one thing that often comes to mind is whether or not you are ready for another pet. Should we wait or get a new pet right away? Should we wait until the older pet dies and first have a pet memorial for the kids? Would getting a new dog traumatize the older pet? Should we buy or adopt a pet?

The most important thing to do is to access your situation. Often times, when one pet is getting old, it’s a good idea to go ahead and introduce a new pet. It may even help the older pet live longer.

It is often easier to introduce two pets when they are young, but with a little know-how, it is possible to introduce a new pet to your old one. If you have plenty of love for both of them and a lot of patience, you can do it.

You must first be sure that your new pet is disease-free and up-to-date on its shots because you don’t want your older pet to get sick. Make sure both pets are neutered, and that you’ll be able to afford your new pet. Here’s a chart for the average first year of expenses for pets:

A small dog is $780; a large dog is $1,500; a cat is $640, a rabbit is $885 and a small bird is around $185.

Adopting a pet is the best thing people can do nowadays, because there are so many. There is a viral email petition going around concerning the Obama family dog, asking Senator Obama and his family to adopt their first dog. He promised children they could get a dog no matter whether he wins the election or not.

Over four million unwanted pets are in the United States, many of which are up for adoption. Sadly, seven million dogs and cats are killed each year due to overpopulation. Did you know that 20 to 30 percent of the dogs up for adoption in shelters are purebreds? The other 70 to 75 percent are most often mixed breed animals.

In order to adopt a pet, you might want to start by visiting www.petfinder.com, a site that lists many shelters across the US. You can also search for specific breeds or breed mixes. Also just be aware that if all dogs on a particular shelter’s website are described the same way (sweet, loving, friendly, etc.) then that shelter probably doesn’t know the individual dogs’ personalities so you may want to avoid the shelter.

Be sure to contact the shelters in your area and ask about their return policy. Good shelters will accept any dog or cat they have adopted out in the past as a return during any time in his life. Check out the adoption procedures, so you can visit with your new pet outside of the shelter kennel. Good shelters also don’t promote dogs who have a prior history of bad tempers.

Always avoid any preconceptions about what kind of pet including its age, breed, color, sex or size - and be prepared to have an open mind.

Once you have chosen your new pet, the best way to introduce new pets in your family is to put the new pet in his or her own room for a week before allowing the younger pet to be around it. Spend plenty of time with each pet. Let the new pet out of its room, and let the older pet goes in the room where the new pet was staying, so it can get used to the new pet’s smell without being intimidated.

Be very loving to both pets and always respect them. Then let them see one another but do not allow any physical contact. Or you could separate the animals with a child gate. If you hear some hissing or growling, know that this is normal. Once they seem to be used to seeing one another, let them get together, but make sure that someone supervises them. Provide treats to each animal and feed them in separate bowls at opposite sides of the room so they won’t fight for the food. This should be done at the same time every day until the animals become used to the routine. Over time, move the dishes closer together - slowly. If either animal shows signs of aggression, move their dishes back to the original starting point. Wait a few more days and move the pans closer once again.

Never let your animals be together unsupervised until they are completely comfortable with one another, to avoid fights. This process may take anywhere from one to six weeks. However if done right, in the end, you will have a calm family and happy pets.

And as sad as it may be, when an older pet dies, make sure that you have planned for a pet memorial. Let your children help choose a pet urn for cremation, or a pet casket for their pet’s burial, along with a memorial keepsake box for photos. This along with adopting another pet, can help children through sad times.[ad#ad-1]

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Dealing With Cat fights


Cat fights always seem to start through arguments over territory or a struggle for dominance. The areas they fight over tend to be high places or new furniture that has not been marked yet. We have two play stations - one about three foot six and one about four foot tall. There is often a spat over who will have the highest platform and it is usually Louie our red Somali, who appears to be more dominant. In a cats hierarchy the higher the cat is physically, the more dominant the cat is.

These battles are really no more than spats. A quick paw and a hefty growl may well let the invader know “this is no time for revolution”. Fights seem to be more apparent if there is a change in the weather. We have always felt that Louies’ territory is the garden. He loves to hunt and he spends a lot of time out there. Ellie, our blue Burmese on the other hand, spends time in the house where she is close to people. When it rains Lou gets pretty melancholy. Hr cant go out so now he’s also got to share the house with Ellie. This means those territory boundaries have got to be fought over all over again.

Cats fightingAnother time fights started was when our patterns of behaviour changed. It can have an effect on the cats. For example, the main bedroom had always been Ellie’s territory. This is probably because as a Burmese Ellie always needs to be where the people of the house are. This didn’t bother Lou so much. Also Ellie enjoyed the warmth of the bed. Lou on the other hand had a thick fur coat to keep him warm so was not enticed. However for some reason we started giving them treats last thing at night. Treats which Lou was absolutely bonkers about. Suddenly the bedroom was the place to be. We then began to notice fights breaking out (instigated by Lou) just as we were going to bed. Again, a case of “this town aint big enough for the both of us.” Don’t get me wrong these fights are infrequent but what I want to emphasize is, if you look close enough you will see patterns that you can remedy. We started to give them their treats in a separate room. This did the trick nicely.

It is difficult to know when they are fighting or playing. Most of the time play is obvious. They will chase each other around the house; thunder up and down the stairs; and even play hide and seek behind the furniture. This is great to see and a reflection of how they get on most of the time. But there are times when tempers seem strained and there is more than just play in the air.

These times we have found are usually accompanied by low, long fearsome growls, tails erect and bushy, bodies confrontative in the prone position, ears flat and back on their heads. Where tussles which started out as roly poly turn fighting which creates a frightened squeal from one or the other. Simple chasing turns to stalking with an ulterior and aggressive motive.

We were advised by our breeder that this fighting was usually over territory and dominance and therefore they had to work it out for themselves. The philosophy being the loser will submit, the victor will gain dominance, and the fighting will cease quite quickly. Which it does tend to do. If you intervene you prevent the natural progression taking place and it will only start again (as Mother Nature says it must).

But it is difficult sometimes to listen to one of the cat when she sounds frightened or either in pain. We were advised that the time to intervene was when one of the cats is cornered. So this is what we do.

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